# Friday, 13 February 2009

Check out http://events.sftsrc.com/ for more new classes…

  • LINQ
    • 2 days of LINQ to Objects, LINQ to XML, LINQ to SQL, LINQ to Entities and more
  • ASP.NET
    • 5 days of ASP.NET including some AJAX and a hint of Silverlight
  • WPF
    • 3 days of WPF goodness
  • Silverlight
    • 2 days for those with WPF experience or
    • 3 days for web developers
  • C#  and the .NET Framework
    • 5 days of C# 3.0 and the 3.5 framework, including LINQ, extension methods and the rest of the new language features
Friday, 13 February 2009 10:17:36 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Thursday, 10 April 2008
If you are doing anything even remotely involving Ajax or client side script, and you like Firefox like I like Firefox, go and get a copy of Firebug.  I quite literally don't know what I would do without it.  Firebug provides very comprehensive script debugging, allowing you to set breakpoints in your JavaScript, step through it, etc.  It also shows you all the requests and responses for all your post-backs, and lets you examine HTML, CSS, and script as well as the client side DOM at "run-time".  It's been invaluable in helping me figure out how ASP.NET Ajax is supposed to work and what's wrong with the JavaScript I'm writing (it's been a while). 





Good stuff.

Ajax | ASP.NET | Work
Thursday, 10 April 2008 10:56:03 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
Thanks to one of the other SoftSource guys here (yay, Ben!) we got the problem resolved.  Turns out if was also a problem under VS 2005, but only sometimes and nobody noticed.  Huh.  Anyway, there was a bit in the base page that was creating a control dynamically and inserting it into the control hierarchy.  In order to find out where it was supposed to go, it was recursively traversing the control hierarchy looking for the right one, before LoadViewState.  This causes the repeater to be created too early, and when ViewState comes along, it sees the control has already been created and so does nothing. 

This goes to show once again, just don't mess with the control hierarchy.  Nothing good can come of it.  Even better, just don't use repeaters and come up with a better way of doing things.  I'm finally doing some "real" Ajax using client side JavaScript to make asynchronous callbacks.  Sooooo much better than using update panels.  Yes, it requires writing JavaScript (of which I'm mildly scared) but it turns out to be pretty easy, and the pages are not only much more responsive, but much more deterministic in their behavior.  We're now essentially only rendering the full page once, then making all the changes client side.  The programming model is a bit harder, but the results are worth it.

Thursday, 10 April 2008 10:32:49 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Tuesday, 25 March 2008
Yes, once again repeaters and ViewState are the bane of my existence... 

We have several pages that follow essentially the same pattern:  we have repeaters that include text boxes/check boxes, etc.  We need to retrieve the values from those controls in order to get feedback from the user.  To do that, the controls themselves are set to AutoPostBack=true.  (To make things more complicated, these repeaters are sitting inside an ASP.NET Ajax UpdatePanel.) When the post back happens, we grab the updated values from the repeater items, save them, then re-databind the repeaters.  This is less than optimal, I have come to see, but it worked.  That's worked, past tense.  As soon as we moved the project to VS 2008, it completely fails to work.  I'm pretty sure that ViewState is involved, since essentially we were relying on the repeaters being populated from ViewState before being databound.  That seems to no longer be the case.  To make matters worse, when I tried to code up a trivial example to demonstrate the problem, it works fine.  Curses! 

I'm down to two possibly explanations, neither of which I've been succesful proving so far.  Either something in the page is touching those repeaters before LoadViewState, thus screwing up the object creation, or the new 3.5 version of Ajax is passing ViewState differently on Async PostBacks.  Either way, we're working around it right now, but it would still be nice to know what happened.

My key learning from this whole experience?  Repeaters are the work of the devil, and writing HTML by hand wasn't such a bad idea. :-)

Tuesday, 25 March 2008 09:43:11 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Tuesday, 22 January 2008
I've been poking around a bit with the new ASP.NET MVC stuff, and so far I am very favorably impressed.  Sure, there are some things to work out, but I think they represent exactly the right level of abstraction for getting serious work done.  One of the things I've noticed lately since I've been doing lots of ASP.NET work is that the "classic" (if that works here) ASP.NET postback model is very very good at making the trivial case trivial.  If all you want is a simple form that pretends to have button click events, it's super easy.  Unfortunately for many of us, however, it is also very very good at making less trivial cases really hard.  At some point (and relatively quickly, I think) we spend a lot of time fighting the ASP.NET model rather than taking advantage of it.  I have spent hours trying to deal with the fact that ASP.NET is trying to make me code like I was writing a windows forms application when what I'm really writing is a web app.  I shouldn't have to worry about whether or not I need to handle some bit of rendering in OnInit or OnPreInit.  I know what HTML I want, but ASP.NET can make it hard to get there.

The new MVC model is the level of abstraction I'd like to work at.  I know I'm writing a web app, so better to embrace that fact and deal with requests and responses rather than trying to pretend that I have button click events.  The MVC model will make it very easy to get the HTML I want without having to fight the model.  I haven't logged enough time to have found the (inevitable) rough edges yet, but so far if I was starting a new web project I'd definitely want to do it using the MVC model.  The fact that it is easy to write unit test code is an added bonus (and well done, there!) but what really strikes me as useful is the model. 

If you want a web app, write a web app!

Tuesday, 22 January 2008 13:38:41 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Wednesday, 26 December 2007
A while back I was having a problem with getting events to fire from a drop down list inside a repeater.  In that case, I turned off ViewState for the Repeater control, and everything worked fine after that.  Well, last week I came upon a situation (much to complicated to go into here) where that just wouldn't work.  I needed the ViewState to be on, and knew there should be a reasonable way to make it work.  To make a (much too) long story short, after talking it through with Leo I discovered the error of my ways.  I was populating the items inside the drop down list during the Repeater's ItemCreated event.  Apparently that's bad.  I took exactly the same code and moved it to the handler for ItemDataBound, and everyone was happy.  Now I can leave ViewState on, correctly populate the items in the list, and actully get the SelectedIndexChanged event properly fired from each and every DropDownList. 

It's the little things...

Wednesday, 26 December 2007 12:13:48 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Thursday, 15 November 2007
I know it's been a bit quiet hereabouts of late.  I'm in the middle of a writing project, as well as a (relatively) new work situation still, and trying to catch up from the fact that my knowledge of ASP.NET basically consisted of "there's code behind" before.  So far my feelings are mixed.  Sometimes I think ASP.NET if pretty darned clever.  Other days I find myself longing for the days of CGI, when at least it was easy to understand what was supposed to happen.  Those days usually have something to do with viewstate. :-)  Anyway...

I've also been learning about the ASP.NET Ajax goodies, and ran into an interesting problem.  If you are using UpdatePanel, you absolutely cannot mess with the control hierarchy after the update panel has been created.  If you do, you'll be presented with an helpful error that basically reads "you've screwed something up!".  It took a while to get to the root of the problem given that input.  Turned out that the update panel was in markup for my page, but somewhere between when it got created and OnInit for the page, the control hiearchy was being changed.  I won't go into detail about how, but suffice it to say stuff in the page got wrapped with some other stuff, thereby changing the hierarchy.  Nobody else seemed to mind, except for the updatepanel.  Too make a potentially very long story only slightly long, as long as all of the screwing around with the controls is done in or prior to OnPreInit for the page, all is well.  Once that change was made everything was happy, and the update panels work fine. 

The page lifecycle is possibly one of the great mysteries of our time...

Thursday, 15 November 2007 10:24:37 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  | 
# Wednesday, 17 October 2007
OK, I'm the first to admit that when it comes to writing ASP.NET I'm a complete newbie.  Before I started on the project I'm currently working on I'd probably written less than 10 ASP.NET pages.  So maybe this is obvious to the set of all people not me.  But I think maybe not.

I've got a repeater inside a form.  Each item in the repeater is composed of three DropDownList controls.  Those dropdowns are populated via databinding.  When the user has made all of their selections using the dropdowns, the hit the "go" button and a PostBack happens.  I spent the last full day (like since this time yesterday) trying to figure out why no matter what I tried I couldn't retrieve the value the user selected after the form posted back.  Gone.  Every time I got the post back, all of the dropdowns has a selected index of -1. *@!~#!!

I was pretty sure I had the overall pattern down right, since just the day before I made this work in another page that used textboxes instead of dropdownlists.  See the dent in my forehead from the keyboard?  Sure, initially I had some other problems like repopulating the data in the drop downs every time, etc., but I got past that.

Google proved comparatively fruitless.  Lots of people couldn't figure out how to databind the list of items to the drop down, but nobody was talking about posting back results.  The lightening struck, and I found a reference to someone having problems with events not firing from drop down lists if the repeater's ViewStateEnabled == true.  Granted, I'm not hooking up the events, but you never know. 

That was it. 

<asp:Repeater ID="medicationRepeater" runat="server" EnableViewState="false">

Now the PostBack works just like I would expect.  Why this should be is completely beyond my ken.

Anyone?
              

Wednesday, 17 October 2007 13:25:06 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  |