# Monday, December 18, 2006

Since time immemorial (or since Marconi, anyhow) those wishing to be licensed as Radio Amateurs in the US have had to pass a Morse code test.  Relatively recently, there has been an entry level license class (Technician) that doesn't require passing the code test, but which (therefore) comes with no privileges on the HF bands (for long-distance communications). 

The code requirement has long been a hotly contested issue among amateurs.  Many have maintained that learning Morse code meant that you were "serious" about amateur radio, and would therefore be a skilled and considerate radio operator.  The problem is, since so few people actually use Morse code on the radio anymore, it has become (in my opinion, and that of many others) an artificial hoop that had to be jumped through before you could get into the high priesthood of amateur radio.  Most of the General or Extra class licensees I've talked to have never ditted or dahed once since passing the test. 

What this means for me personally is that I can finally hope to upgrade to a General class license.  I've studied all the material, and am pretty sure that I could pass the exam, but given the way the rest of my life works, I've been unable (or unwilling) to devote the time it would take to learn Morse code, so I've never taken the test. 

Of course, if I did pass the test, I'd want to get an HF-capable radio, but that's a whole different problem. :-)

CERT | Radio
Monday, December 18, 2006 12:38:55 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Related posts:
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