# Tuesday, June 03, 2003

Once upon a time I did the happy dance on stage (in San Francisco: “Anatomy of an eCommerce Web Site”) because I was so excited about the new BizTalk orchestration designer in BTS 2000.  What a great idea, so be able to draw business processes in Visio, then use the drawing to create code that knows how to manage a long running transactional business process.  I had been preaching the gospel of the CommerceServer pipeline as a way of separating business process from code, but BT Orchestrations was even better.

Little did I know…  Yesterday (I’m here at TechEd in Dallas) I saw a demo of BTS 2004.  Wow.  Microsoft has really made great strides in advancing the orchestration interface.  Instead of Visio, it’s now a Visual Studio.NET plugin, and the interface looks really good.  It includes hints to make sure you get everything set up corrects, and full IntelliSense to speed things along.  I was very impressed with the smoothness of the interface.  Not only that, but now you can expose your orchestration as an XML Web Service, and you can call Web Services from inside your schedule. 

I’ve always thought that BTS has gotten short shrift in the developer community.  I think it’s because it tends to be pigeon-holed as something only useful in big B2B projects.  I can think of lots of ways in which orchestration could be very useful outside the realm of B2B.  I guess part of it has to do with the pricing.  While I can think of lots of ways to use BTS in non-B2B scenarios, they aren’t really compelling enough to convince me to spend that much money.  Ah well.